Beyond the Ice Wall Part VIII

Much of the following, it would appear, warrants a degree of contextualisation within the framework of perspective. That of the vantage point from which one is approaching the nature of the universe, and how one applies the lens of density – or dimension, albeit one will find a bit of a tangle over the distinctions between them and also their interconnection, depending on whom you source – to subjects that are most usually perceived and discussed in an “objectively” 3D manner.  I’ve broached this in The Earth – Part IV, and the potential for models of the Earth and the

Beyond the Ice Wall Part VII

Further ground is broached in relation to Nos Confunden’s publications in this Q &A, but there’s much more still to go. Beyond which, the answers received, in many instances, beg further lines of inquiry all their own. The main takeaway is that, while this source appears invaluable in a slew of areas, in certain key ones Claudio Nocelli (and/or the Morrises – father William and daughter Helen) appears to be rather wide of the mark.  Several of the points raised here are specifically clarifiers in relation to earlier, potentially conflicting answers. There is also, however, clarification of clarification arising, which

Beyond the Ice Wall Part VI

This isn’t the more extensive look into Nos Confunden’s – via experiencers William and Helen Morris – detailing of the lands and peoples beyond the Ice Wall I intended as a follow up to Part V, so that will have to be Part VII. Indeed, the following questions are mostly unrelated to the information from those sources, aside from those relating barriers/domes. This is, like Antimatter III, a relatively brief post in the series, but there’ll be more to come.     Q. Were the other four craters created for similar purposes to the one for humans (to establish a

Beyond the Ice Wall Part V

Any attempts to distil the realm beyond the Ice Wall is going to be hit and miss, short of a filmed travelogue starring Michael Palin, and Q & As so far have inevitably fallen prey to assumptions based on the morsels of verification yielded by “Yes” and “No” responses. I encountered the William Morris (father) and Helen Morris (daughter) accounts of their experiences in the lands beyond a couple of years back but admittedly didn’t pay them sufficient credit, in part because they’re quite elaborate (Helen’s especially, in terms of the range of places, peoples and events) but mostly because